Posts

Forester Lumbar 650 Pack

Professionals know when to use the right tool for the job at the right time. No one walks onto a job site with just a hammer. No mechanic opens the hood with just one size wrench. They know that every situation is different. Those situations can also change 10 times before lunch, and that’s why they go to work armed with a variety of tools so they can succeed in every situation.

The same thing is true for those who live a life outdoors. As outdoorsmen and women, we spend the vast majority of our time either hunting, fishing, or scouting.  Seasons and species that you’re chasing change and you need your equipment to change and adapt accordingly.

That’s why now, during the warmer months of the year, one of your go-to tools should be the Forester Lumbar 650 Pack from Elevation.

If you’ve ever found yourself hanging trail cams, chasing a gobbling tom, or getting to the deer stand in the early season wishing for a lightweight mobile pack – this pack is it. It allows for easy packing of your essentials along with a variety of extras that you’ll need in the field or on the go. The pack is also perfect for those warmer weather pursuits without weighing you down so you can go farther, and more comfortably into the woods.

The pack features heavy-duty and highly adjustable shoulder straps that sit comfortably on your shoulders while a waist belt with breathable foam insulation sits comfortably on your hips. The open back area allows for more airflow and breathability than your traditional pack would. This is a huge benefit while you’re on your hike or while you’re scouting and checking trail cams in the warm offseason.

The pack is armed with an astounding 650 cubic inches of storage with three main pockets on the back. Each pocket contains separate netting inside affording extra organization and storage options. There are three extra pockets on the back for quick stashing items like a water bottle, game calls, or batteries.

Two clinchable straps are also strategically placed on the bottom of the pack for storage of a jacket, decoys, bedroll, or a hunting stool. This all seasons pack is perfect for dove season right into early archery.

There are an additional six extra storage pockets on the waist belt, as well. These storage pockets are smaller and perfect for an extra can of bug spray, snacks, wallet, keys, or game calls. All of the pack’s zippers can be easily opened with their rugged and extra-wide openings so you won’t have to fumble in the dark or if you’re in a hurry.

The straps are adjustable and easily maneuvered either stationary or on the go. This makes it perfect for getting to where you need to go after just hearing that gobbler, checking your trail cameras, or if you need to adjust after putting on a jacket.

This pack is not only durable but it’s also quiet. It also stores easily and is worth way more than what you’d pay for similar products on the market. It shouldn’t come as a surprise if it becomes your go-to pack whether you’re enjoying the outdoors, getting ready for hunting season, or taking a hike with your friends and family.

You can get more information on this and other great archery packs and products by visiting the Elevation website here.

public-land-deer-hunting-strategy-for-pennsylvania-Feature 1

Tips for Public Land Deer Scouting in Pennsylvania

Public land Deer Scouting and Hunting in Pennsylvania 

The dog days of summer are here. Hot temperatures and humidity have most people wanting to stay inside and stay cool. These days, however, are when deer hunting success, this fall, can be earned. Having success while deer hunting on public land in Pennsylvania does not come easy. PA has lots of hunters, so you will be up against the competition. But, for those who decide they want to put in some hard work during these summer days, some amazing hunting opportunities are available. The hunters you know or see being successful during the fall are often they ones that put in hours of work during the summer to put the odds in their favor during the fall. Follow these tips this summer for scouting whitetails on public land here in the keystone state. 

  1. Utilize maps before physically scouting 

Whether you use a GPS, map, topo mapphone app, or google earth, utilize it before going there in person to scout. This is how you can “scout from the computer.” Look at topography of the area. Look for potential feeding fields, ridges, river bottoms, access trails, parking areas, funnels, pinch points, and whatever else you can find. Doing these things ahead of time can save you so much time and energy. Learn as much about the piece you plan to scout, before you even step foot on it. This will put you ahead of the game when you do go to scout the area.  

2. Get away from pressure 

This probably sounds familiar, but it is one of the most important things to keep in mind. Most deer in general, but especially smart deer, will avoid areas that have the most human pressure. This is where using your maps to mark parking areas and access trails becomes even more important. When you mark those things on a map, you can start to narrow down areas that are going to be the hardest to access. Cross off areas that look like they are easy to get to and popular for hunters. Look for those back corners, overlooked spots, and hardest to reach places. The less pressure it gets from other hunters, the better chance you will have at seeing deer there during daylight.  

3. Scout for bedding 

When you go to scout a piece of public land, one of the most important things to do is identify where the deer in the area are bedding. Yes, it is important to find feeding areas, trails, benches, funnels, and pinch points, but the number one thing to find is bedding areas. Successful public land hunters are usually the ones that are hunting closest to where the deer bed. Deer on public land probably won’t move far from their bedding areas during daylight. Hunting as close to that bedding as possible, without being detected, will give you the best opportunity to get a shot during legal shooting hours.  

4. Use trail cams as an extra tool, not your replacement for scouting.  

Trail cameras are becoming more and more popular as time goes on. I can’t stress enough how useful they can be when they are used right. They can do some work for you while you are not even there. They can teach hunters what caliber of deer are in an area, how many deer are in an area, the times of day they are moving through a certain area, and the list could go on. There are so many benefits. All that being said, it is important to not let trail cameras actually replace the importance of physically scouting an area. Trail cameras will never tell hunters the full story. Hunters need to know where bedding is, where travel routes are, where feeding areas are, and everything else about the areas surrounding their trail cameras or hunting areas. Don’t simply walk into the woods, set up a few trail cams, and walk back out without learning anything about the area.  

5. More is better 

When it comes to public land deer scouting in the summer, the more you scout, the better your chances will be. There are certain situations on private land, or when scouting or hunting during the fall where overkill will have a negative effect. But during these summer days get out there and hit it hard. The season is still a couple months away, so get out there and learn as much as you can now, before hunting season comes. Don’t just go out in November hoping to get lucky, get out there now and earn your fall success right here in August!